RECIPES FOR YOUR PATIENTS

For recipes click here

TIP #1

IT’S NOT ALWAYS AN EVEN EXCHANGE

When you substitute yogurt for fats and liquids in your cooking, it’s not always an even, cup-for-cup exchange. As a general rule, add the minimum you think you’ll need and add more slowly, as required to avoid thinning.

Here are a few substitution ratios to keep in mind:

You can reduce the oil in all your recipes with this easy formula: 1/2 cup of oil is equivalent to 3/4 cup of yogurt. For example, if a recipe calls for 1 cup of oil, replace it with 1/2 a cup of oil and 3/4 cup of yogurt.

Reduce the butter in your recipes with this simple ratio: 1/2 cup of butter
(1 stick) equals 1/4 cup of yogurt. For example, if a recipe calls for 1 cup of butter, replace it with 1/2 cup of butter and 1/4 cup of yogurt.

When baking, you can try replacing one egg with 1/4 cup yogurt.

TIP #2

MAKE IT PLAIN

If you cook with yogurt, make sure you know which flavor is best suited for each recipe. Savory dishes may taste better with plain yogurt, while flavored yogurt works well with sweet dishes. Ultimately, it’s a matter of personal preference, so feel free to experiment!

The main thing to keep in mind is that different types of yogurt have different tastes that will affect your end result!

Greek is a little tangier in taste than plain yogurt, so it really lends itself to recipes like meat marinades, salad dressings, dips, and potato dishes.

Plain yogurt tends to work really well as a substitute in baking.

TIP #3

USE YOGURT WISELY

Before you substitute yogurt for everything, here are a few pointers to get the most out of it in your cooking.

The way you stir and heat yogurt will make a big difference in the result:

Over-stirring yogurt may cause it to break down and thin out. Never vigorously stir, whisk, or beat yogurt. Instead, fold it into your recipes to maintain its rich and creamy consistency.

If you heat yogurt too quickly, it will separate into curds and whey. Avoid this by removing dish from heat first and let cool slightly. Then slowly stir in room-temperature yogurt.

Speaking of heating, don’t forget that when yogurt is heated above 120 Degree F, it loses its beneficial bacteria. The acidity in yogurt can react negatively to aluminum, so avoid using aluminum foil or aluminum baking dishes when cooking or baking with it.

Nutrition Facts and Substitution Chart

Your patients can start substituting with yogurt in their favorite recipes today!

RECIPES FOR YOUR PATIENTS

CARROT GINGER SOUP

This recipe is a crowd pleaser and hits the top of the list when it comes to healthy alternative breakfast recipes for your patients.

BREAKFAST PARFAIT WITH FRESH FRUIT

CALYPSO CRUSH

TROPICAL BERRY SMOOTHIE

SWEET SUMMER SMOOTHIE

STUFFED FRENCH TOAST

STRAWBERRY SHORT CAKE

POWER BERRY FREEZE

MULTI-GRAIN PANCAKES

BANANAS AND HONEY SMOOTHIE

TROPICAL TREASURE

CREAMY SPICED HUMMUS

CREAMY GUACAMOLE

GRILLED CHICKEN SANDWICH

HORSERADISH AND YOGURT CRUSTED SALMON

GREEN GODDESS EDAMAME SALAD AND DRESSING

FISH TACOS

CUCUMBER AND YOGURT SOUP

CHICKEN SALAD

BASIL AND SUN-DRIED TOMATO DIP

BALSAMIC YOGURT DIP

TANDOORI CHICKEN

CREAMLESS CORN WITH CILANTRO AND LIME

CREAMY PEAR & CHICKEN WALDORF

CREAMY SWEET POTATO SOUP

OVEN-BAKED CRUNCHY SESAME CHICKEN STRIPS

GRILLED TURKEY WITH CITRUS YOGURT MARINADE

TOMATO AND ALMOND GAZPACHO